Chau’u Polo – Behind the Scenes in Los Palos


THE MAKING OF CHAU’O POLO

A short ‘behind the scenes’ look at the fun we had with the young people of Lospalos Timor Leste as we trained them in all aspects of film making.

The result was a 15 minute short film they titled Chau’u Polo, which as far as we can make out means something like ‘baldy or baldhead!’

We spent 10 days filming this fictional drama created and written from scratch. It’s about a poor smelly schoolboy who is teased at school but who later in life becomes a local hero by being very successful. And how does he get to be so successful? Through wisdom given to him by a very large crocodile who befriends him whilst fishing one day!

We believe this film is the first fictional short film ever written, filmed, edited and screened by locals all in Tetun. The music is also 100% local with one song recorded on ‘the street’ outside the house we stayed in. The other song is written and sung by a young lad all in Fataluku. Fataluku is one of the many languages of East Timor, and is spoken in and around the town of Lospalos, in the Lautem district with about 35,000 speakers. As Fataluku is a Papuan language, it is very different from Tetun and most other languages of East Timor, which are Austronesian languages.

Thanks so much to Paulo Almeida and Sol Nation for the use of their cool music track.

Chau’u Polo – A short film made in Lospalos Timor-Leste

This short film is a sensation!

We spent 10 days in Lospalos working with an enthusiastic group of young people, to build a media centre, equip it and to train them in all aspects of film making.

To train them we asked them what story they would like to tell and they came up with a positive drama based on a young boy they called Chau’u Polo. It’s about a poor smelly schoolboy who is teased at school but who later in life becomes a local hero being very successful. And how does he get to be so successful? Through wisdom given to him by a very lage crocodile who befriends him whilst fishing one day!

Okay so how do we film dialogue between a young boy and a crocodile with no special effects, in remote Timor Leste and ‘no speaka da lingo’? Simple the young people reply. We ask La Fiek (Grandfather Crocodile) to come to us and put in an appearance. So we did and so he did.

We believe this film is the first fictional drama short ever written, filmed, edited and screened by locals all in Tetun. The music is also 100% local with one song recorded on ‘the street’ outside the house we stayed in and the other written and sung by a young lad all in Fataluku. Fataluku is one of the many languages of East Timor, and is spoken in and around the town of Lospalos, in the Lautem district with about 35,000 speakers. As Fataluku is a Papuan language, it is very different from Tetun and most other languages of East Timor, which are Austronesian languages.

Aboriginal Anti Violence – Bairnsdale

4 Televison Ads designed by Wayne Tindall for Indigenous Communities in the Grampians Region of Victoria.

Recently the Victoria Police Violence Against Women and Children Strategy Group engaged an independent and appropriately qualified Service Provider (Wayne Tindall) to undertake the production of four television commercials and a DVD containing the television commercials, as part of a public awareness campaign targeting family violence and sexual assault within the Aboriginal community.
The objectives of the Indigenous Family Violence and Sexual Assault Awareness Campaign were to:

  • improve relationships between the local Indigenous community and Victoria Police;
  • increase community awareness and understanding of the impacts of family violence and sexual assault;
  • identify strategies for victims of family violence and sexual assault;
  • achieve increased reporting of family violence by Aboriginal communities and in the longer term, provide an overall reduction of the incidence of violence
  • and sexual assault against women and children in these locations; and
  • engage with the Aboriginal community in order to identify local issues specific to family violence and sexual assault.

The campaign was managed by Victoria Police, however the television commercials were developed locally by Wayne Tindall from Change the World and NBS Productions in partnership with local Aboriginal communities in the Region.

GEGAC played a major role in facilitating a smooth production schedule and its facilities were used in many scenes.

The 4 television commercials have been produced and aired, and have proven to be a huge success in the area.
TV Ad #1

 TV ad #2

TV Ad #3

TVAd#4

 

Aboriginal Anti Violence – Grampians

4 Televison Ads designed by Wayne Tindall for Indigenous Communities in the Grampians Region of Victoria.

Recently, Change the World creative director Wayne Tindall spearheaded a campaign in the Grampians region of Victoria working with the Victoria Police Violence Against Women and Children Strategy Group. This is a  public awareness campaign targeting family violence and sexual assault within the Aboriginal community.
TV Ad #1

Grampions TVC 1 – Speak Out Campaign from wayne tindall on Vimeo.

 TV ad #2

Grampions TVC 2 – Speak Out Campaign from wayne tindall on Vimeo.

TV Ad #3

Grampions TVC 3 – Speak Out Campaign from wayne tindall on Vimeo.

TVAd#4

Grampions TVC 4 – Speak Out Campaign from wayne tindall on Vimeo.

 

The objectives of the Indigenous Family Violence and Sexual Assault Awareness Campaign are to:
•    improve relationships between the local Indigenous community and Victoria Police;
•    increase community awareness and understanding of the impacts of family violence and sexual assault;
•    identify strategies for victims of family violence and sexual assault;
•    achieve increased reporting of family violence by Aboriginal communities and in the longer term, provide an overall reduction of the incidence of violence ?and sexual assault against women and children in these locations; and
•    engage with the Aboriginal community in order to identify local issues specific ?to family violence and sexual assault.

The campaign was managed by Victoria Police but the four television commercials were developed by Wayne Tindall working with NBS Productions and in partnership with local Aboriginal communities in the Grampians Region to ensure they are responsive to local issues. Once again the results have been outstanding with local people fronting the commercials with astounding frankness and power. The advertisements  are currently airing across this part of Victoria.

Aboriginal Anti Smoking – Mildura

Change the World is changing the lives of Indigenous communities across Australia!

Once again we teamed up with NBS Productions and put our creative hats on to come up with a powerful ‘Anti Smoking Campaign’ for the Indigenous Community in Mildura Victoria.

The desired target audience was broad being:
• Young people that had never smoked
• Young people who smoked
• Mum’s and Dad’s who smoked at hoe and around the kids
• Pregnant mums
• Middle aged parents and singles and
• Elders

The community decided that nothing short of a ‘hard hitting’ campaign would suffice. They had ‘had enough!’

We involved the community at all levels in the creative act of this campaign ensuring that the key messages would be absorbed by a process of ‘osmosis’, and pride and self esteem would be elevated thus creating a platform from which to build dialogue around an ‘anti smoking’ message.

We also built a holisitic support campaign around the Tv ads including:

  • Billboards
  • Posters
  • USB Wristbands
  • Social Media Sites
  • T-Shirts & Caps


1. Swallow This

This TVC drives home the truth that we would NEVER feed harmful chemicals to our family or children, yet if we smoke around them we are doing just that!


2. Just Like Mum

This TVC is seen from the perspective of an unborn child who is hoping that Mum will give up (cigarettes) so that she (the unborn child) will not be born already addicted to nicotine and heading down the path to trying to give up cigarettes before she can even walk!


3. Doing it to Ourselves

This TV advertisements underlines the reality that all of us have control over our own lives.

    • No one can ‘make us’ unhealthy.
    • We have a choice.
    • The future is where we need to be looking.
    • Our families rely on us to take control.
    • There are no excuses.


3. Tell Me Your Dreams

A deeply personal plea (from Rudy Kirby CEO of MDAS) in Victoria), to all Aboriginal people in his community and beyond to NEVER take up smoking because it will take away your dreams forever!

 

Aboriginal Anti Smoking-Bairnsdale

We recently teamed up with NBS Productions and put our creative hats on to come up with an impressive ‘Anti Smoking Campaign’ for the Indigenous Community in Bairnsdale Victoria.

The desired target audience was broad being:
• Young people that had never smoked
• Young people who smoked
• Mum’s and Dad’s who smoked at hoe and around the kids
• Pregnant mums
• Middle aged parents and singles and
• Elders

We quickly decided to take a holistic approach realising that a campaign of this nature will not be successful with 4 ‘stand alone’ TVC’s without supporting media and the re enforcement of existing social network sites.

Together with the support of the client group, we secured a small group of Indigenous youths who committed to work with us to come up with initial ideas and help with all stages of production in exchange for some formal and professional training in mainstream film and television production.

The idea was that by involving the community at all levels in the actual creative act of this campaign, the key messages would be absorbed by a process of ‘osmosis’, and pride and self esteem would be elevated thus creating a platform from which to build dialogue around an ‘anti smoking’ message.

Four key areas and approaches were identified.
1. A PROUD MOMENT
An advert that targets the financial cost to a family when a parent is smoking.

Indigenous Anti Smoking – No Good Aye “A Proud Moment” from wayne tindall on Vimeo.

2. THE GREATEST GIFT
A hard-hitting ad that targets the family situation when a parent dies through smoking caused
diseases

Indigenous Anti Smoking – No Good Aye “The Greatest Gift” from wayne tindall on Vimeo.

3. IT’S YOUR FUTURE
An ad that targets youths with a clear outline of cause and effect IE: choices today have impact
tomorrow!

Indigenous Anti Smoking – No Good Aye “It’s Your Future” from wayne tindall on Vimeo.

4. NOT FOR ME
A clear message from the community that smoking is “NO GOOD AYE”

Indigenous Anti Smoking – No Good Aye “Not For Me” from wayne tindall on Vimeo.

The initial proposal encompassed the following media:
• Television
• Radio
• Billboards
• Posters
• T Shirts/caps/USB wrist-bands
• On Line/Youtube/Facebook/Twitter
• Mobile Phone

         

We proposed a fairly ‘hard hitting’ approach without ‘preaching directly at existing smokers but rather by using a family/community perspective to get the message across.

We felt that by using a selected group of young people in the production process and by documenting this process and placing ‘behind the scenes’ clips on dedicated facebook/twitter pages, a great deal of local, national and even international interest would be generated.

Coober Pedy Arts Project

Change the World’s CEO and resident artist Wayne Tindall recently spent two weeks working for the Stride Foundation to assist in delivering a public space mural painting program for young people in Coober Pedy.

Stride Foundation is a non-profit, non-government organisation working across Australia to improve the physical, mental and social wellbeing of young people and their communities. Role model and mentoring programs are delivered in some of the most disadvantaged remote, rural and metropolitan areas across Australia. Sport, Art, Music and Environmental Activities are used to re-engage, build resilience and help young people to fulfill their true potential.

After two weeks of hard work the results speak for themselves. The paintings are the result of a collaborative process between all people involved with a ‘hands on’ approach resulting in pride, a sense of self worth and local ownership of the works of art in the Coober Pedy Basketball Courts.